"Romeo And Juliet," "Beowulf," "The Epic Of Gilgamesh" And "The Odyssey": Demonstration Of Epic Qualities That Aristotle Imitates

are epitomized, as well as how they endure within their most supreme existence, Beowulf also displays various sociological and humanistic tendencies that are not often recognized in the traditional telling.

Divine Kingship, the Chosen in Beowulf and Excalibur

above. Everything is used to bring this about, particularly magical symbolism, but as it is set within the period. For example, Beowulf is the story of the "Spear-Danes" and the

Beowulf as a Christ-like Figure

pagan elements. The world pictured in Beowulf is dominated by warriors, men who placed their faith primarily in two things -- their leader (their "thane") and in "wyrd" (a

Christianity in Beowulf

in defending his people. It is a story that has its origins in pagan culture, but it was recorded by a Christian scribe (Saupe 97). Therefore there are "overlays" that

Beowulf as Myth

dragon; when the two halves of the poem are viewed in conjunction with one another, its mythic intent becomes apparent as it draws upon both Anglo-Saxon and Christian values to

The Epic “Beowulf”

text, a supernatural force, and the celebration of the hero. Structurally speaking, an epic is "a long narrative poem on a great and serious subject" (Lucas). A primary epic

Digressions in Beouwulf.

as connectors, or "verbal doorways" which link the poem and its legends with larger worlds. Digressions The digressions in this poem seem to work at three levels. We have

Beowulf as Christian and Christian Elements in the Poem “Beowulf”

overall situation and conflict between the pagan and Christian religions which existed in England at that time. The heavy Christian influence in the poem however, is reflected in the Christian

Beowulf & Aeneas

Aeneas is bound by the heroic values of a warrior class. However, while Aeneas first inclination is to fight the invading Greeks, he is presented with portents and powerful visual

Pagan and Christian Values in Beowulf

as the Last Survivors Speech. This melancholic and fatalistic monologue brings about a profound tonal shift in the poem, reversing the previous tone of Anglo-Saxon bravado which champions the values

Beowulf : Pagan or Christian Hero?

the Church deemed it proper to allow them to retain many of their former customs, providing those customs were not explicitly forbidden by the Bible. The same approach applies

Beowulf v. Odysseus/Who is the most attractive?

great mead-hall Heorot, which is ruled by Hrothgar. Section VIII of the poem pictures Beowulf addressing the assembly and bragging extravagantly about his own brave, skill and heroism. He says,

Beowulf: Heeded Hrothgar's Advice?

are representative of the earnest attempts required for such characters of this particular genre to assert their worthiness; indeed, when one looks carefully at the inference of such supreme power

Beowulf and the Matter of Perspective

bravery and loyalty in Anglo-Saxon culture, will become the primary focus of the entire work. To understand the mechanism of this change, it is first necessary to understand the role

Heaney and Raffel’s Translations of Beowulf

might compare Heaneys "the kings who ruled them had courage and greatness" in line 2, which prepares the reader for the unfolding of a historical genealogy with Raffels "the glory